Orford’s Sanda House B&B

Sanda House is a heritage-listed bed and breakfast at Orford, on Tasmania’s East Coast.
Orford is a one-hour-and-fifteen-minute drive from Hobart (81 km) and a 40-minute drive from Swansea (57 km).
Built-in the 1840s, Sanda House is the oldest building in Orford. The property has four bedrooms. The king-size Rose Room, originally the kitchen, has a wood heater, original stone floors and walls, a private bathroom and direct access to the front verandah and gardens. The queen-size Jasmine Room and twin Wisteria room have ensuite bathrooms, original wood floors and stone walls. The Mulberry Room is an ensuite room with its own fenced courtyard and a glimpse of the bay. A delicious breakfast includes cereal, yoghurt, coffee, toast, home-made jams, fruit from the orchard (seasonal), and a choice of three cooked specials is included in the tariff.
Sanda House sits on an acre of cottage garden, 20+ orchard trees and a kitchen veggie patch. Take a stroll along the beach, over the cliffs to Spring Beach. There are restaurants within walking distance. From Orford, you can drive to Triabunna and board a ferry to the Maria Island National Park, or drive further along the East Coast to Freycinet National Park.

Contact Details

33 Walpole Street
Orford, 7190

6257 1020
info@orfordsandahouse.com.au
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© East Coast Tasmania Tourism

The Tasmanian tourism industry acknowledges the Tasmanian Aboriginal people and their enduring custodianship of lutruwita / Tasmania. We honour 40,000 years of uninterrupted care, protection and belonging to these islands, before the invasion and colonisation of European settlement. As a tourism industry that welcomes visitors to these lands, we acknowledge our responsibility to represent to our visitors Tasmania's deep and complex history, fully, respectfully and truthfully. We acknowledge the Aboriginal people who continue to care for this country today. We pay our respects to their elders, past and present. We honour their stories, songs, art, and culture, and their aspirations for the future of their people and these lands. We respectfully ask that tourism be a part of that future.