East Coast Natureworld

East Coast Natureworld is the perfect place to experience Tasmania’s unique animals, birds and reptiles. Operating for over thirty years, Natureworld offers a more intimate, interactive, and ultimately enjoyable experience with Tasmanian wildlife.
Originally a birdlife park, Natureworld has evolved into a nature world, where Tasmanian wildlife, birdlife and flora can be seen and appreciated by all. With 150 acres of forest, lagoon and beach frontage the extensive park grounds allow you to wander around at your own leisure.
Wheelchair and pram-friendly paths allow all to experience the uniqueness of Tasmania up close. Tasmanian native animal talks are 10 am 12 pm and 2 pm daily, which includes Tasmanian Devil feedings.
There is food and drink served for most of the day in the Gallery Cafe. For the wildlife photography enthusiast, there is an extensive display of Tasmanian wildlife photography. The gift shop has a wide range of souvenirs with a wildlife and Tasmanian theme.
Bicheno is a two-hour-and-15-minute drive (177 kilometres) from Hobart.

Contact Details

18356A Tasman Highway
Bicheno, 7215

6375 1311
info@natureworld.com.au
Visit Website

Sign up to our newsletter

Join us and be the first to hear about exclusive deals, insider travel tips, competitions and events.

© East Coast Tasmania Tourism

The Tasmanian tourism industry acknowledges the Tasmanian Aboriginal people and their enduring custodianship of lutruwita / Tasmania. We honour 40,000 years of uninterrupted care, protection and belonging to these islands, before the invasion and colonisation of European settlement. As a tourism industry that welcomes visitors to these lands, we acknowledge our responsibility to represent to our visitors Tasmania's deep and complex history, fully, respectfully and truthfully. We acknowledge the Aboriginal people who continue to care for this country today. We pay our respects to their elders, past and present. We honour their stories, songs, art, and culture, and their aspirations for the future of their people and these lands. We respectfully ask that tourism be a part of that future.